6 Ways to help a Veteran

1. Give a veteran a ride

 

Medical care may be needed for some veterans for the rest of their lives. Disabled American Veterans provides free transportation to men and women who can't travel to Veterans Affairs medical facilities on their own. You can volunteer to drive a van for those who need a lift.

2. Donate frequent flier miles

 

The Fisher House Foundation has a network of homes on the grounds of military and VA hospitals around the country. These homes help family members be close during the hospitalization of a loved one for a combat injury, illness or disease. Fisher House operates the Hero Miles Program, using donated frequent flier miles to bring family members to the bedside of injured service members. You can also volunteer or donate household items.

3. Support Mission 22 in Suicide Prevention

Mission 22 has three major programs.  Funding veterans to receive treatment for Post Traumatic Stress, Traumatic Brain Injury and other issues they may be facing through Mission 22 Programs as well as many partner organizations, large scale public art to honor veterans and creating impact in communities for the issues veterans are facing today.

There are memorials dedicated to the fallen warriors of nearly every major conflict in our country’s history. They remind us of the sacrifice, they honor those we’ve lost, and they tie civilian to soldier. But there was no national monument for those who have fallen in the war against Veteran suicide until the War at Home Memorial was created. 

With your support, we were able to build one. We raised a monument—and awareness. We are working with community leaders in locations like Norfolk, Washington DC and New York City to create a permanent exhibit to pay tribute to those we have lost here at home. 

4. Help them take flight

 

According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, an estimated 640 World War II veterans die every day. The Honor Flight Network helps veterans of the "greatest generation" make a free pilgrimage to the World War II Memorial on the National Mall in Washington. You can volunteer to escort these men and women on the flight to see this memorial. Honor Flight also plans to help Korean and Vietnam War veterans visit memorials to those wars in Washington as well.

 

5. Share their stories

 

So many veterans' stories have been left untold, but the Library of Congress is collecting the tales of veterans of every war with the Veterans History Project. If you are related to a veteran or know one who has a story to tell, the Library of Congress wants to hear it. Help veterans share their stories before it's too late. For directions on how to get involved, check out the Veterans History Project.

6. Say thank you

It's simple, but it can make an impact. And so many veterans have never heard the words "thank you." If you know a veteran or see someone in a military uniform, say something. It may make his or her day and yours.

© 2019 American Legion Hatfield Post 933

Webmaster - Mark Kaiser